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Creole...the spoken language

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  • Creole...the spoken language

    Can it present a problem in lyrics writing? Do you feel the language is limited in specificity?
    Let me give you an example: the word bagay is used a lot in our speech...It is like when we are stuck in English, we use the word thing to express our thoughts...
    Flaubert Gustave coined this term, le mot juste, as he was working for the right word to use to express a thought...
    Does the Creole language provide us with that right word that is not general in nature but to the point and that resonates with the listener, that strikes a chord in their soul?
    I was listening to a radio station based in Haiti where the debate was centered around French and Creole...Many were defending the creole language, and how it needs to be used in the schools, and the French defender was showing how difficult it would be. He believes that the language does not provide that mot juste, that right word to express a thought...The gentleman presented the word "chen" to the Creole supporters and asked to talk about it.

    What do you say to that as it pertains to lyrics?
    I have to run for a quick minute and I will be back to debate this...Please do share your ideas objectively...

    Life is about balance...I am in the middle of that scale getting a better view of the left and of the right.

  • #2
    Re: Creole...the spoken language

    Tout' jen w gadel , Kreyol la se yion problem...pou yion seri agresseur....It's the language of truth......the revolutionary language....the vivid language ...
    I think that they should revise it, put it in a higher level, have a seminary about it and use it in schools , why not?
    Fe bagay.......fe yion lot bagay have 2 different meanings ... fe yion kichoy: do something...etc.
    La Publicité est une Force et La Force de Votre Publicité c'est Radio Haiti Publicité!, (R.H.P)

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    • #3
      Re: Creole...the spoken language

      I am all for French language primary and Creole secondary language. French is global and will benefit us Haitians more than patois Creole, anyone who wants to progress and study abroad ( Canada, France, Ivory Coast etc.). will need to be fluid in French. What I don't get is that when Haitians travel to other country like USA they would learn English ASAP because they need to speak the language to survive, why are they so lazy when it comes to learning French which will be more beneficial in the long run. In Guadeloupe for example, they speak Creole and French and French is primary period, there's no debate as to which language should be primary and which should be secondary. The main reason Haiti has not progress is because we confuse our own selves.
      "Life is like a box of chocolate you never know what you're gonna get" Forrest Gump.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Creole...the spoken language

        Originally posted by ChrisRoi View Post
        Can it present a problem in lyrics writing? Do you feel the language is limited in specificity?
        Let me give you an example: the word bagay is used a lot in our speech...It is like when we are stuck in English, we use the word thing to express our thoughts...
        Flaubert Gustave coined this term, le mot juste, as he was working for the right word to use to express a thought...
        Does the Creole language provide us with that right word that is not general in nature but to the point and that resonates with the listener, that strikes a chord in their soul?
        I was listening to a radio station based in Haiti where the debate was centered around French and Creole...Many were defending the creole language, and how it needs to be used in the schools, and the French defender was showing how difficult it would be. He believes that the language does not provide that mot juste, that right word to express a thought...The gentleman presented the word "chen" to the Creole supporters and asked to talk about it.

        What do you say to that as it pertains to lyrics?
        I have to run for a quick minute and I will be back to debate this...Please do share your ideas objectively...


        M panse gouvenman sipoze recruit de seri de gwo linguistics pou mete structure nan lang kreyol la epi nou nan batay..M panse yo sipoze elimine francais nan lekol yo paske it's a waste..Si leta te focus nan lang Spanish ak English li tap plus beneficial pou ti moun kap leve nan peyi ya..Francais se yon tan pedi li ye pandan lang panyol ak anglais pi fasil pou aprann e gen plus potential e plus lucrative nan Americas la.
        "When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own house, his possessions are safe." - Luke 11:21 NIV

        Of David. Blessed be the
        Lord, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle; Psalms 144:1

        Every 2nd Count

        Semper Fi

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Creole...the spoken language

          Good Stuff, DJ, Fairlady, DonJuan...
          Do you think the creole language limit our ability to write profound lyrics?
          Or is it a case of lyricists not fully abreast of the language, and its usage?
          En passant, what language did Boisrond use for such timeless declaration?
          "Pour rédiger cet Acte, avait dit Boisrond Tonnerre, il nous faut la peau d’ un blanc pour parchemin, son crâne pour écritoire, son sang pour encre et une baïonette pour plumes"
          Life is about balance...I am in the middle of that scale getting a better view of the left and of the right.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Creole...the spoken language

            Originally posted by ChrisRoi View Post
            Good Stuff, DJ, Fairlady, DonJuan...
            Do you think the creole language limit our ability to write profound lyrics?
            Or is it a case of lyricists not fully abreast of the language, and its usage?
            En passansome , what language did Boisrond use for such timeless declaration?
            "Pour rédiger cet Acte, avait dit Boisrond Tonnerre, il nous faut la peau d’ un blanc pour parchemin, son crâne pour écritoire, son sang pour encre et une baïonette pour plumes"
            Creole is an informal language, always was & always will be, we have a hand full of Caribbean islands speaking some sort of French creole patois, the more we ( Haitians) dwell on making Creole a formal language the further behind we will be. However, I don't think Creole language limit one's ability to write profound lyrics, we tend to find any reason as to why we are not good at something. A good lyricist is a good lyricist and should be able to use any language formal or informal language to relay messages to the public. You wrote Boisrond declaration in French and you are asking us what language was it written, why didn't u write it in Creole?
            "Life is like a box of chocolate you never know what you're gonna get" Forrest Gump.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Creole...the spoken language

              Tout a un commencement dans la vie. Le debut est toujours tres difficile, mais la perseverance engendre un future qui nous ouvre des voies incroyables et innimaginables. Si nan tan manmanm ak papam education national te bay kreol la valel, mwen pense nou tap pilwen jodiya kom pep ki kwe nan laveni societe yo.

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              • #8
                Re: Creole...the spoken language

                Talking about rich lyrics in Creole...

                The master...








                I never did give anyone hell, I just told the truth and they thought it was hell

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Creole...the spoken language

                  Originally posted by FairLady View Post
                  You wrote Boisrond declaration in French and you are asking us what language was it written, why didn't u write it in Creole?
                  I only asked, FairLady, because those are the words we remember from the History books. I am wondering if the history books had reported those words in Creole, if that was indeed the language used by Boisrond, would we have a better appreciation for the language. A language becomes powerful to the children of a land when the great speeches given were said in that particular language, where they can mimic the voices, the intonation, so forth and so on.
                  And again, I am only wondering if the creole language would have been more widely accepted if those words were given life through the Creole sound, pitch...
                  An example:
                  The "I have a dream speech", the Gettysburg address, and the famous Churchill speeches...
                  Life is about balance...I am in the middle of that scale getting a better view of the left and of the right.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Creole...the spoken language

                    Originally posted by ChrisRoi View Post
                    I only asked, FairLady, because those are the words we remember from the History books. I am wondering if the history books had reported those words in Creole, if that was indeed the language used by Boisrond, would we have a better appreciation for the language. A language becomes powerful to the children of a land when the great speeches given were said in that particular language, where they can mimic the voices, the intonation, so forth and so on.
                    And again, I am only wondering if the creole language would have been more widely accepted if those words were given life through the Creole sound, pitch...
                    An example:
                    The "I have a dream speech", the Gettysburg address, and the famous Churchill speeches...
                    The slaves were planning a revolution, they used creole language as a form of preventative tool against the French when they were communicating amongst themselves. So, from that stand point, I believe Boisrond speech was made in creole patois since he was speaking with the slaves. The speech was written in our history book in French. The creole language is accepted, it is part of who we are and our heritage & history, it's simply not a formal language. Like everywhere else where creole patois is being spoken they are also fluid in one of the three formal languages ( French, Spanish, English) the three main global languages spoken around the world. Whether we want to accept it or not, French language is part of our history as well, we are not in slavery time anymore, maybe some are still having some type of mental slavery, however, we need to adapt to French language and use it to our advantage.
                    "Life is like a box of chocolate you never know what you're gonna get" Forrest Gump.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Creole...the spoken language

                      This is not a pwoblem of language, it's lack of imagination.

                      As for education again, this is not a problem of Creole,French or English. Vous avez l'éducation que vous méritez avec les profs que vous avez... Si pwofésè a pa pale Fransè osnon Anglè byen kijan pou timoun yo apran lang la byen? Gade leu Ayisyen al Montreal,Nouyok etc kijan yo apran lang la vit leu yo an kontack kotidyenman ak lang la, kote yo ka pale san komplexe si yo fè erè. Sa se problem ayisyen, nou pè pale mal pou yo pa sa ri nou.. E poutan san nan fè érè ou vin bon.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Creole...the spoken language

                        Referring the Boirond Tonerre's quote is not by accident. It would have helped the Haitian children to be more connected to the language if those words were reported in the History books in Creole. Those words would have become a sound, like a song that we sing and it would have become part of us. We learned those famous quotes in French...
                        Aristide, in my opinion, was the first one to blaze the trail so we connect with the language through his rhetoric back in the 80s. As students, it was shocking that to hear such utterance in Creole and it created a love for the language. I believe those Coup D'Etats stunted the language's growth.
                        TBaz, I do agree that it is a lack of creativity.

                        Life is about balance...I am in the middle of that scale getting a better view of the left and of the right.

                        Comment

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